US deployment of missile defense radar in Japan makes China concerned

The United States delivered a second AN/TPY-2, a high-resolution X-band radar at its military communication facility at Kyogamisaki Sub-Base in Kyoto, Japan earlier last week. The said radar is designed to detect incoming ballistic missiles at 600-mile range. The radar may send cues to US Navy’s ship-based Aegis missile defense systems, Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS), Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) or launch a Ground Based Interceptor (BGI).

“Particularly with respect to North Korean nuclear program, in Kyoto city, the Kyogamisaki sub-base has been selected as a site for additional deployment of our TPY-2 radar,” Japanese Defense Minister Itsunori Onodera said last year.

“This additional radar will bolster our ability to defend the U.S. homeland and Japan against North Korea’s ballistic missiles,” U.S. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel said on the same period last year.

However, China raised concern on the latest deployment. “The anti-missile deployment in the Asia-Pacific by certain country in the pursuit of unilateral security goes against regional strategic stability and mutual trust, as well as peace and stability in Northeast Asia,” its foreign ministry said.

“Such an action is particularly concerning when the situation in the region is complex and sensitive. The Chinese side believes that relevant country should proceed from regional peace and stability, stay committed to maintaining regional security through political and diplomatic means, and shall not infringe upon other countries’ security interests under the pretext of aforementioned action,” Chinese Foreign Ministry added.